Sri Lankan chicken curry, Moroccan lamb soup and Tuscan beef ragu… try these mouth-watering ways to reverse type 2 diabetes, and transform your health.

Today, in the final part of our unique series, NHS GP Dr David Unwin explains why full-fat dairy is allowed on a low-carb regimen, while chef and food writer Katie Caldesi shows you quick recipes for batch-cooking to make it all even easier!

Rich creamy sauces, butter melted on your vegetables and a healthy drizzle of olive oil on your salad. Rich creamy sauces, butter melted on your vegetables and a healthy drizzle of olive oil on your salad. These are some of the delicious foods that are firmly on the menu on a low-carb diet. My patients are often amazed and delighted to hear they can eat these, yet still lose weight and potentially reverse their type 2 diabetes, too 

Rich creamy sauces, butter melted on your vegetables and a healthy drizzle of olive oil on your salad. These are some of the delicious foods that are firmly on the menu on a low-carb diet. My patients are often amazed and delighted to hear they can eat these, yet still lose weight and potentially reverse their type 2 diabetes, too [Stock image]
By DR DAVID UNWIN FOR THE DAILY MAIL

These are some of the delicious foods that are firmly on the menu on a low-carb diet. My patients are often amazed and delighted to hear they can eat these, yet still lose weight and potentially reverse their type 2 diabetes, too.

The full-fat dairy and the good fats that a low-carb regimen permits — and which Katie Caldesi has used in her delicious recipes in the Mail this week — are a key reason that people feel so satisfied with the food on this diet, which makes it much easier to keep as a permanent pa

But might these extra fats be bad news for your risk of heart disease, strokes or circulatory diseases?

Doctors agree that heart disease is a particular worry for those with type 2 diabetes, as people with poorly controlled blood-sugar levels are prone to circulatory problems and, as well as heart attacks and stroke, this means kidney and eye problems.

When I started using low carb to help my patients with type 2 diabetes improve their blood-sugar levels, I did initially worry that if my patients were eating fewer carbs (such as bread or potatoes) but more dietary cholesterol (such as eggs) and fat, would this increase their risk of heart disease?

Remember to stop by our Support Forum where you can share or learn healthy info.

However, as I revealed in Wednesday’s Mail, as well as blood-sugar levels, a low-carb approach can have a surprisingly positive effect on blood pressure. And far more astonishing have been the significant improvements in my patients’ average cholesterol levels.

Research I published last October in the journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health, showed that not only had 46 per cent of my type 2 diabetes patients who’d gone low carb reversed their condition after two years (with the average patient losing 18lb, or 8kg), but they also saw significant improvement in their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, too. 

Their total cholesterol reading reduced by 10 per cent, their HDL (or ‘good’) cholesterol went up by 8 per cent, and their triglyceride levels (another key blood fat implicated in cardiovascular disease) improved by a whopping 35 per cent. And eight patients came off their statins.

Related: Low-Carb Diet Drives Type 2 Diabetes Remission

Our findings have been borne out by an analysis published in 2018 by researchers from Liverpool John Moores University, who examined more than 1,000 people following either a low-fat diet or a low-carb diet for six months or more, and concluded that carbohydrate restriction appeared superior in improving blood cholesterol and blood fats compared with low-fat diets.

In my early days as a GP, I advised my patients to avoid all dietary sources of fat and cholesterol, explaining they were ‘clogging the circulation’. People duly gave up butter, cream, cheese and eggs, but so often the results of their blood tests did not reflect all their sacrifices. I was disappointed and mystified.

Source: Daily Mail

Do you use batch-cooking to feed your family? Everyone’s process is a little different. In the comments below, please share how you do it – cooking order, how do you store your food, etc. Thanks!

This site displays Affiliate links. Click here to read the Disclaimer.


Ericka Scott

I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in 2000. Since then, I've been on a mission to help myself and loved ones living with Diabetes and High Blood Pressure, to prepare healthy and TASTY meals. Now, I'm here to help YOU do the same!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply